AUP4019Wayne Greene

Professor & Head

Department of Animal Sciences

education

Ph.D. Virginia Tech
M.S. North Carolina State University
B.S. North Carolina State University

Professional Experience

2005-Present – Professor and Head, Department of Animal Sciences, Auburn University
1981-2005 Texas A&M University System
1981 – 1997 Texas A&M University, Department of Animal Science, College Station
1981 – 1987 Assistant Professor Animal Nutrition Section
50% Texas A&M University, 50% Texas AgriLife Research
1987 – 1993 Associate Professor and Animal Nutrition Section Leader
50% Texas A&M University, 25% Texas AgriLife Research, 25% Texas AgriLife Extension
Joint Appointment in Veterinary Anatomy and Public Health
1983 – 1997 Professor and Animal Nutrition Section Leader
50% Texas A&M University, 25% Texas AgriLife Research, 25% Texas AgriLife Extension
Joint Appointment in Veterinary Anatomy and Public Health
1997 – 2005 Texas AgriLife Research, Amarillo (75%) and West Texas A&M University, Canyon (25%)
Professor and Beef Cattle Program Leader
1998 Adjunct Professor at Texas Tech University, Department of Animal and Food Sciences

Honors and Awards

2011 Honorary State FFA Degree in Alabama
2011 Father of the Year, Alabama Cattlewomen’s Association
2010 Patriot Award – Awarded by the US Department of Defense in support of reserve employee deployment
2008 Awarded Honorary Member of Southeast Livestock Exposition
2003 Texas AgriLife Research Fellow
2003 Texas A&M University System Board of Regents Fellow
1991 American Society of Animal Science Southern Section Young Animal Scientist-Research Award
1981 American Society of Animal Science, First Place, Southern Section Awards Competition Paper

Professional Affiliations

Alpha Zeta
American Registry of Professional Animal Scientist
American Society of Animal Science
Gamma Sigma Delta
Sigma Xi

Research activities

Research has focused on mineral nutrition of beef cattle in grazing and fed environments. Research has been conducted to determine the site and extent of magnesium absorption in ruminants along with developing feeding management strategies to reduce the incidence of grass tetan – a significant metabolic disease affecting beef cattle immediately after calving. Research has also been conducted to reduce the environmental effects of mineral excretion from cattle fed in confined animal feeding operations.

Extension activities

Extension and Outreach programs have focused on mineral nutrition needs of grazing cattle.

courses taught

ANSC 3410 – Animal Nutrition and Metabolism

UNIV 1100 – Success Strategies: Pre-Vet Learning Communities

select publications

  • Vasconcelos, J. T., N. A. Cole, K. W. McBride, A. Gueye, M. L. Galyean, C. R. Richardson, and L. W. Greene. 2009. Effects of dietary crude protein and supplemental urea levels on nitrogen and phosphorus utilization by feedlot cattle. J Anim Sci 87: 1174-1183.
  • Cole, N. A., K. McCuistion, L. W. Greene, and F. T. McCollum. 2011. Effects of concentration and source of wet distiller’s grains on digestibility of steam-flaked corn-based diets fed to finishing steers. The Professional Animal Scientist 27:302-311.
  • McCuistion, K.C., F. T. McCollum III, L. W. Greene, J. MacDonald, and B. Bean. 2011. Performance of stocker cattle grazing 2 sorghum-sudangrass hybrids under various stocking rates. The Professional Animal Scientist 27:92-100.